Tag: Western African Coast 2016

Senegal is cut in two by The Gambia. This results from the colonial folly that granted the British control of the Gambia river for 200 miles (320 km) inland and ten miles (16 km) on both sides of the river. The area south of The Gambia is called Casamance and is considering itself as distinct from the rest of Senegal. People living there belong to another ethnic group and are mostly Christian contrary to the Muslim majority in the rest of the country. The existence of The Gambia also hindered exchange between the two parts of the country. […]

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The Gambia is the smallest country within mainland Africa and shaped as only a colonial administrator can dream up a country. It stretches 200 miles (320 km) inland along the Gambia river and 10 miles (16 km) north and south from the river. Towards the coast it is a bit wider with straight borders, drawn up on a map and not shaped by events on the ground. It was a British (and before that Portuguese) “possession” darting into the French Senegal. […]

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I enter Senegal by boat, crossing the river of the same name from Mauritania. Rosso is a provincial town and as I see no ATM, I change a note of 20€ to have some cash. A minivan drives down the road slowly and someone shouts Saint-Louis. They stop for me. I have seen this in many parts of the world where transport operates on the we-leave-when-full-maxim. They prowl the streets to fill up the car and as this saves me the walk to the bus station I hop on. It should have made me suspicious […]

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You don’t have to feel bad if you have never heard about this country. Actually, even right on the ground, the Western Sahara is hard to find. I know it is there, but I honestly see no trace.
Western Sahara is one of the most sparsely populated territories on earth. It mainly consists of desert flatlands. Along the bus ride from Laâyoune to Dakhla I remember hardly any settlement of size. It is a barren landscape, […]

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I consider my visit to Morocco as a passing-through. Better to spend more time in the harder to reach countries that will come later on my journey. I can always come back easily to Morocco. But if I am passing through, I try to do it in style. Travelled in a direct route from my point of entry, Tangier, it will be more than 1,300 kilometres before I leave Morocco and enter the Western Sahara. Counting in the Western Sahara, as that disputed territory is under Moroccan control, it will be 2,240 kilometres. Makes sense to break the journey a few times. […]

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In 2011, there was no question that I would go on my first visit to the African continent. Not because I already knew all the other continents, I didn’t, but because I wanted to explore Africa most of all. I had a very enjoyable three-and-a-half months getting from Cape Town to the island of Zanzibar. Africa was wonderful. The landscapes were fantastic, the people friendly, I fell deeply in love with Africa’s wildlife and travelling was easy enough. Communication in the (bar Mozambique) English-speaking countries was a breeze. After leaving beautiful and interesting South Africa behind […]

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Gramais is the smallest independent municipality of Austria. A tiny village, about twenty houses, at the end of the valley. That’s all there is. The one restaurant is closed on Mondays. It is beautiful, the Lechtal Alps rise steeply and on a clear day the beautiful Leiterspitze is visible in the distance. There are no big hotels, buses are not allowed on the road, Gramais has spared itself to get overrun. […]

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